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AWORI PEOPLE: DISTINCT SUB-YORUBA COASTAL PEOPLE OF LAGOS STATE AND OGUN STATE
The Awori are peaceful, coastal agro-fishery and distinct Yoruba-speaking people that forms a sub-ethnic group of the larger Yoruba people of West Africa, particularly in Nigeria and Benin. The Aworis are found majorly in Ogun State and Lagos State.
The Awori are a tribe of the Yoruba people speaking a distinct dialect of the Yoruba language.
The Aworis are organized set of people who share common cultural values in varying degrees with other Yoruba and Edo groups. Though the Aworis are mainly Yoruba speakers, but due to trans-national and inter-ethnic interactions, the majority of the Aworis are bilingual, speaking the Yoruba and Ogu languages (often referred to as Egun). They are found at Apa, Igbogbele, Iworo, among others. The Ogu are also bilingual, speaking both the Ogu and Yoruba languages and they are found across coastal south western Nigeria, Benin Republic, Togo and Ghana. the Awori Ogu of the Badagry coastal area of southwestern Nigeria.
Legend has it that Prince Olofin and his followers left the palace of King Oduduwa in Ile-Ife and migrated southward along a river. Olofin is one of Oduduwa’s son
King Oduduwa had given Olofin a mud plate, instructing him to place it on the water and follow it until it sank into the river.
It is said that several days after leaving Ile-Ife, the plate suddenly stopped near Olokemeji near present-day Abeokuta. And after seventeen days, it began moving again.
It would later stop for another seventeen days at Oke-Ata. At the end of seventeen days, the mud plate began moving again, only to stop again on the southern outskirts of present-day Abeokuta, where it stayed for another seventeen days.
It was here some of Olofin’s followers decided to remain. This group of people was under the leadership of a man named Osho Aro-bi-ologbo-egan.
Among the Aworis, traditional beliefs and practice exists side-by-side Islam and Christianity.
Even some of the Awori combined Islam or Christianity with their traditional beliefs and practices

 

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