nowayobloggers

Akwa Ibom is often described as a uni-cultural State where norms, taboos, customs and traditions are the same. The folkways may vary from one ethnic grouping to another, but the operational cultural norms are basically the same all over the State.  The cultural similarities binds the people together especially in such areas as cuisines, dressing, dances, songs, rituals, folklores, beliefs and myths.  Almost all aspects of its culture have potentials to provide fascinating experiences for tourists and for investment opportunities.
Special Dances
Asian Ubo Ikpa
Asian Uboikpa means the proud and flamboyant maiden. This dance is performed by maidens between the age of 18 years and 25 years who have successfully gone through the ‘Mbopo’ institution. Mbopo being the period a girl is confined, fattened and drilled on all aspects of home management in preparation for marriage. It is common in almost all the hinterland of the State. Performed by maidens at their prime, Asian Uboikpa therefore is in its visual appeal and celebrates and affirm the youthful innocence and purity in their beauty, while showcasing the popular admonition among the Akwa Ibom people that chastity once lost is lost forever.
Oko
Oko is the male dance which is likened to the war dance because of its ferocious displays. The climax of this dance starts when the dancers’ start slashing at one another with razor sharp machetes and firing at themselves with live bullets from Dane guns. But mysteriously, not a drop of blood is shed as the machetes cannot penetrate the skin of the dancers, or the bullets hurt any of the members of what is obviously a secret society.
Nkerebe
Nkerebe (looking for husband) is another women dance, performed once a year when young girls at the age of puberty prepare to perform the Mboppo nceremony.
Asian Mbre Iban
Asian Mbre Iban are dances performed by maidens who wish to inform unmarried men of the community how beautiful and eligible they are. Other women dances include Akan, Asamba and Uwok which is performed in the villages occasionally.
Ndok Ufok Ebe
The Ndok Ufok Ebe (shame of a bad marriage) is another women dance to express their grievances over maltreatment of women by their husbands. The dance is performed once a year. It is accompanied by songs telling the community about their plight, often, it involves going topless to the market place.
Ebre
There is also the Ebre society women dance performed yearly during harvesting of new yam. During this occasion, women dance to the market place and neighbouring villages. The dance is not only meant to entertain but as well as deliberate protest against what is regarded as male chauvinism, which is reflected in the vulgarity of some of the song texts.

SHARE

Comments

    NO COMMENT

Leave Your Comment

Sign up to continue.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked.

Already a member?? Login